LOST BUT LOVED

Following a record-breaking year for overdoses in Luzerne County in 2017, which contributed to the declaration of a statewide disaster emergency in January, we used the state Right-to-Know Law to secure the names of all 151 victims and reached out to their families to tell their stories and offer insight into the scourge of drug abuse.
We are not publishing the names of all victims, just those whose survivors chose to participate. They were eager to share not only the pain and frustration that addiction has brought to their lives, but also the love and fond memories they hold still for those they have lost.

Tyler Lanning: ‘It could happen to anybody’

Tyler Lanning: ‘It could happen to anybody’

When Lauren Stewart and her 9-year-old son, Jacob Lanning, were watching “The Dark Knight,” Jacob was curious about the actor who played the Joker. “He asked why Heath Ledger wasn’t in the other Batmans, and I had to explain that he died the same way Dad...

Police taking drug fight to Darknet

The increasing toll of opioid deaths in recent years has coincided with the growing use of the Darknet, an unregulated, largely anonymous part of the Internet that often facilitates the sale of illegal drugs — especially the synthetic opioid...

Brittany Moscatelli: From anguish to addiction

Brittany Moscatelli: From anguish to addiction

The final hours of Brittany Moscatelli’s life remain a mystery, but what killed the 19-year-old is certain — an opioid overdose. Moscatelli’s body was discovered in a Wilkes-Barre area hotel room on Sept. 14, 2017. She had no ID on her, none of the jewelry...

Agencies addressing mental illness, addiction

Agencies addressing mental illness, addiction

Area agencies have been ramping up efforts to better address the co-occurrence of mental illness and substance abuse in response to the opioid epidemic in Northeast Pennsylvania. This co-occurrence has long been recognized by mental health...

Old Forge man prints cards to help others find help

Old Forge man prints cards to help others find help

When the state Health Secretary visited northeast Pennsylvania during a recent health provider summit, Michael Arcangeletti slipped her a card. The bright blue card is his simple solution to help solve a complex, lingering problem — opioid addiction. The...

NEED HELP?

IN A CRISIS
Local caseworkers for Helpline are available 24 hours a day to refer callers to resources available for those with drug and alcohol problems. Call 570-829-1341 or visit www.helpline-nepa.info.
The state has a similar program, “PA Get Help Now.” The phone number is 1-800-662-4357 (HELP).

COUNTY ASSISTANCE
The Luzerne County Drug and Alcohol Program can be reached at 570-826-8790.

For a full list of resources and treatment centers, click here.

%

of the overdose victims in 2017 in Luzerne County were under the age of 35

Lost but Loved: The Victims

Click through for their pictures and stories

Heather Hoffmaster

Heather Hoffmaster had two kids, a steady waitressing job, her own apartment and a close-knit family that supported her. Click here to read more

Gail Davis

Gail Davis died searching for relief from her back pain, her brother believes. Click here to read more

Mariah Noon

PLYMOUTH — Mariah Noon’s body still felt warm when her fiance found her in bed the morning of Feb. 4, 2017.
Click here to read more

Eric Bowman

Following alternating bouts with drug abuse and recovery, Eric Bowman’s relapse in March 2017 killed him, but brought new life to someone he never met. Click here to read more

Paul Sorokas

Addiction can ruin or end a life at any age. Click here to read more

Jack Zakrewski

The last years of Jack Zakrewski’s life were tough. After suffering a heart attack years earlier, Zakrewski, 62, had been on disability toward the end of his life and struggled with back pain as well. Click here to read more

Nikki Lee Bertolette

Inside a nondescript home on Chestnut Street, the living space has been transformed into a shrine to a mother’s grief, a constant reminder that Nikki Lee Bertolette died hiding a terrible secret.  Click here to read more

Gary Havrilla

John Havrilla knew his younger brother, Gary Havrilla, was not going to save himself.  Click here to read more

Brittany Moscatelli

The final hours of Brittany Moscatelli’s life remain a mystery, but what killed the 19-year-old is certain — an opioid overdose. Click here to read more

Tyler Lanning

When Lauren Stewart and her 9-year-old son, Jacob Lanning, were watching “The Dark Knight,” Jacob was curious about the actor who played the Joker. Click here to read more

Stopping the Epidemic

Click through to read what’s being done to combat the opioid epidemic in Luzerne County and beyond

Finding alternatives to opioid painkillers

A significant number of people who overdose on drugs start their addiction with legal prescriptions for opioid painkillers. Oftentimes, the refill is what gets them hooked and craving more, experts say. Click here for more

Oversight coming for sober houses

Addicts seeking drug-and-alcohol-free housing upon leaving highly structured rehabilitation centers often face increased temptation and relapse when moving into unregulated “sober houses” being established across the state in response to the opioid crisis. Click here for more

ADHD

A look at ADHD medication and addiction. Click here for more.

Organ Donations

Grieving families of some drug overdose victims are finding solace in the fact that surging deaths from the opioid epidemic have led to a record number of organ donations around the country. Click here to read more

Vulnerable at any age

You are never too old to suffer from addiction, especially addiction to opioids. Click here to read more.

Treatment centers focus of debate

Most everyone agrees that Luzerne County is in the grip of a deadly opioid epidemic that is killing off residents by the dozens. But when it comes to treating the very people who are dying, most everyone wants that care to happen somewhere other than where they live. Click here to read more.

Bereavement Group

After Carol Coolbaugh’s son died of an overdose in 2009, she tried attending bereavement meetings to help with her grief. Click here to read more.

Involuntary Commitment

As the death toll from the opioid crisis rises, some legislators have promoted involuntary commitment as a way to deal with the problem. Click here to read more.

Mental Health Care

Leaders at Northeast Pennsylvania’s medical school say ongoing initiatives to increase the number of mental health care providers locally and to incorporate behavioral health care at physical health care providers are important factors in addressing the opioid epidemic. Click here to read more.

Mental Illness and Addiction

Area agencies have been ramping up efforts to better address the co-occurrence of mental illness and substance abuse in response to the opioid epidemic in Northeast Pennsylvania. Click here to read more.

Dangers of the Darknet

The increasing toll of opioid deaths in recent years has coincided with the growing use of the Darknet, an unregulated, largely anonymous part of the Internet that often facilitates the sale of illegal drugs — especially the synthetic opioid fentanyl. Click here to read more.

LISTEN: Woman helps Penn State students with drug and alcohol addiction issues

This episode of Take Note is part of “State of Emergency: Searching for solutions to Pennsylvania’s opioids epidemic.” State of Emergency is a combined effort of newsrooms across the state to draw attention to programs, therapies and strategies that are actually showing promise in the fight against this public health crisis.

Danielle Dormer is a mother and Army veteran in long term recovery from drug and alcohol use. She uses her experience to help Penn State students, serving as the assistant program coordinator for the Collegiate Recovery Community. She is also earning her Masters of Education in clinical rehabilitation and mental health counseling at Penn State, where she completed her undergraduate degree in 2017 earning a 4.0 GPA and the Outstanding Adult Student Award. She talked with WPSU’s Cheraine Stanford.

Click here to listen to her story.

Hope After Heroin:
The Epidemic in our Backyard

This 30-minute documentary program from the Associated Press explores the opioid crisis in Western Pennsylvania on a broader level - with a focus on how over-prescription of opioid drugs led to today's epidemic. People who have experienced addiction, either themselves or through a loved one, share their stories of struggle, stigma and loss. But they also show how they've managed to use their pain as a catalyst for change, providing hope for others.